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Common Sense by Thomas Paine

Submitted by on May 1, 2008 – 2:10 pm

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Download
Of the Origin and Design of Government in General A4 | US Letter PDF 300Kb
Of Monarchy and Hereditary Succession A4 | US Letter PDF 350Kb
Thoughts on the Present State of American Affairs (Part 1) A4 | US Letter PDF 340Kb
Thoughts on the Present State of American Affairs (Part 2) A4 | US Letter PDF 330Kb
Of the Present Ability of America A4 | US Letter PDF 520Kb
Appendix A4 | US Letter PDF 450Kb

Selected and Introduced for Short Work by Alex Steffen, editor of Worldchanging

Bombarded as we are with advertising and propaganda looking to link products or candidates to the concept of freedom, we tend to lose sight of how radical a set of ideas democracy, personal liberty and human rights really are, and how recently, really, the fight to make them the universal rule began. The best antidote to that forgetfulness is Common Sense, the book that, in a very real sense, can be credited with raising the American public will to revolution. It was a radical and deep document then. It is still radical today. Would that we had more writers with Paine’s passion, skill and clarity today.

Alex Steffen
April 2008

Thomas Paine (1737-1809). Englishman by birth. American by choice. French by decree. Citizen of the World.

First Published in Philadelphia 1776
Sourced from Project Gutenberg

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Tags: constitution, politics, revolution, Thomas Paine

1 comment - Latest by:
  • Mark Wilensky
    But surprisingly, kids "get" Paine's Common Sense, and almost easily find similarities between 1776 and now. As a fifth-grade teacher ...
    Comment posted on 11-16-2008 at 05:47

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